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theatlantic:

The Sorority Body Image Problem

I should have known sorority life was not for me.
My gut reaction was telling as I walked down the checkerboard floors of the veranda at the Carolina Inn. I sat at a small table, one of 20 or so, in one of the Inn’s elegantly furnished banquet halls. I was provided with a glass of water, a box of tissues, an index card on which to list my sorority preference, and an attentive alumna ready to help me make my choice. It was the fourth and final day of rush at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and I had a decision to make. Having only been called back by one sorority out of 10, I would have to choose whether or not Greek life would be a part of my experience as a student. I hesitated as I ran my finger across the blank space on the card where my signature would be. I signed my name and then I cried.
As a young woman born and raised in North Carolina, attending UNC had always been a dream of mine. In the fall of 2011, I took my chance and transferred in as a junior. I tried to do all the things a new Tar Heel is supposed to do, including rushing a sorority. Close to 12 percent of UNC Chapel Hill’s undergraduate students go Greek, but, surrounded by fraternity and sorority houses, the campus seemed optimized for Greek life. So, I became a part of a system that not only promoted outdated gender stereotypes and an attitude of exclusion, but is also correlated with members having increased episodes of poor self-esteem and disordered eating. And during the spring of 2012, these tendencies of the Greek system came barreling into my personal life, when my sorority sisters started discriminating against me because of my weight.
Read more. [Image: UF Digital Collections/Flickr]

theatlantic:

The Sorority Body Image Problem

I should have known sorority life was not for me.

My gut reaction was telling as I walked down the checkerboard floors of the veranda at the Carolina Inn. I sat at a small table, one of 20 or so, in one of the Inn’s elegantly furnished banquet halls. I was provided with a glass of water, a box of tissues, an index card on which to list my sorority preference, and an attentive alumna ready to help me make my choice. It was the fourth and final day of rush at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and I had a decision to make. Having only been called back by one sorority out of 10, I would have to choose whether or not Greek life would be a part of my experience as a student. I hesitated as I ran my finger across the blank space on the card where my signature would be. I signed my name and then I cried.

As a young woman born and raised in North Carolina, attending UNC had always been a dream of mine. In the fall of 2011, I took my chance and transferred in as a junior. I tried to do all the things a new Tar Heel is supposed to do, including rushing a sorority. Close to 12 percent of UNC Chapel Hill’s undergraduate students go Greek, but, surrounded by fraternity and sorority houses, the campus seemed optimized for Greek life. So, I became a part of a system that not only promoted outdated gender stereotypes and an attitude of exclusion, but is also correlated with members having increased episodes of poor self-esteem and disordered eating. And during the spring of 2012, these tendencies of the Greek system came barreling into my personal life, when my sorority sisters started discriminating against me because of my weight.

Read more. [Image: UF Digital Collections/Flickr]

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg has told University of North Carolina graduates that last week’s gay marriage vote shows there is still a lot of work to be done for civil rights in this country. Bloomberg spoke Sunday to thousands of graduates at Kenan Memorial Stadium.

Their version of success that is held up as normal is one that says life is a struggle of everybody against everybody else, and you have to sacrifice what makes your heart sing. But everything is changing. … We need to devote ourselves … to the service of the planet, to other beings, to give of our gifts in whatever way feels right.
Charles Eisenstein, author of “Sacred Economics,” spearking at Occupy UNC’s “alternative” commencement in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, quoted in Occupy UNC holds ‘alternative’ commencement - Local/State - NewsObserver.com (via bohemiansouth)

Nineteen elected leaders from Orange County [North Carolina] declared their opposition to Amendment One outside Carrboro Town Hall Saturday morning. “People ask me if we’re gonna win this fight,” Chapel Hill Mayor Mark Kleinschmidt said beneath a giant elm tree. “Damn right we’re gonna win this fight!” The proposed amendment to the state Constitution would define marriage as between one man and one woman and prohibit other forms of government-recognized domestic union such as civil unions.

Obama’s message to students was simple: Higher education is crucial for the country’s future and keeping college affordable is necessary.

southernpartofheaven:

I’m also pretty good friends with Obama.

southernpartofheaven:

I’m also pretty good friends with Obama.

Doris Betts, the celebrated Southern writer who for decades nurtured others as a creative writing professor at UNC-Chapel Hill, died Saturday at the age of 79.Betts passed away at her home, Araby Farm, near Pittsboro, more than a year after being diagnosed with lung cancer.The author of six novels and three collections of short stories, among other works, Betts was sometimes compared to the great Southern writer Flannery O’Connor.

Congratulations to Chapel Hill, North Carolina, the only Southern locale to make Time’s list of the 15 most active U.S. cities.