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Florida’s music scene is swamped with styles: sleazy Miami vibes, funk and latin fusion, and folky pop. Sweat Records’ Lauren Reskin is your guide - listen to her picks on Spotify

The biggest hit of her career, “Tennessee Waltz,” about an old friend who steals the singer’s lover while dancing, was No.1 for nine weeks in 1950 and 1951 and is one of seven official state songs for Tennessee.

rollingstone:

Fifty years ago today, #TheBeatles released their first single, “Love Me Do.” “First hearing ‘Love Me Do’ on the radio sent me shivery all over,” #GeorgeHarrison later said. “It was the best buzz of all-time.” You can find our retrospective of the classic track at RollingStone.com. Photo: Evening Standard/Getty Images (Taken with Instagram)

rollingstone:

Fifty years ago today, #TheBeatles released their first single, “Love Me Do.” “First hearing ‘Love Me Do’ on the radio sent me shivery all over,” #GeorgeHarrison later said. “It was the best buzz of all-time.” You can find our retrospective of the classic track at RollingStone.com. Photo: Evening Standard/Getty Images (Taken with Instagram)

Today marks 50 years since the world was introduced to the music giants and the movie spy. Both have stood the test of time, but while the Bond films—the latest, ‘Skyfall,’ lands Oct. 23—accommodated themselves to change, the Beatles changed music forever.

Fifty years ago today, the world was introduced to the first James Bond movie and the first Beatles single on the same day. Both Dr. No and “Love Me Do” debuted Oct. 5, 1962. The world was about to change, although no one probably knew it at the time.

College was no different than high school. In the set-off corners of the classrooms, students would discuss what seemed most important. So, if the Beatles won’t get back together, who will be the next Beatles? Someone said the next great thing would come along in ’74. After all, in ’54, Elvis Presley made his first classic recordings. Then in ’64, the Beatles commanded the world’s attention. That means in ’74… Of course, quirky logic often prevails over common sense. The teachers should have instructed the students to pay more attention to the class assignments and be satisfied with the vast body of work already assembled by the Beatles. Then too, the teachers might’ve observed, Lennon, McCartney and Harrison were releasing stellar solo albums. So forget about a Beatles reunion and don’t count on any other act of their equal to come around in your lifetimes. That would’ve been good advice. In the two-three years that followed the announcement of the Beatles’ break up, there was much great new music happening, and as with what the Beatles created, said new music would matter for decades to come.

R.E.M.’s announcement last year that they had “decided to call it a day as a band” elicited immediate analyses, retrospectives, and personal reflections in newspapers, music and entertainment magazines, and websites. In fact, articles about R.E.M.’s music and legacy continue today, almost one year after they announced their retirement. Just this past July, Stereogum published an analysis of R.E.M.’s albums and, a month earlier, A.V. Club ran the last of a six-part story about the band. Regardless of how laudatory these remembrances, many of them shared an uncomplimentary opinion: The authors said that R.E.M. was once a great and influential band but had been neither for almost two decades. In other words, R.E.M.’s legacy began with 1982’s Chronic Town EP, peaked with 1992’s Automatic For The People, and then faded through 1996’s New Adventures In Hi-Fi. Following this album, which was also the last album with drummer Bill Berry, many critics said that R.E.M. ceased to matter. What happened?

Once, when asked if Ringo Starr was the best drummer in rock ’n’ roll, John Lennon quipped with characteristic, cruel impudence that his band mate ‘wasn’t even the best drummer in the Beatles.’ Which of course is not true, as anyone who’s heard some of Paul McCartney’s clunky solo drum tracks can attest. What is true is that Ringo is sort of the Rodney Dangerfield of rock percussionists. He hasn’t always gotten the respect he merits.

Pete Seeger entertaining Eleanor Roosevelt
Photographed by Joseph Horne

Pete Seeger entertaining Eleanor Roosevelt

Photographed by Joseph Horne

bohemiansouth:

Madeleine Peyroux put on a great show tonight at the Variety Playhouse in Atlanta’s Little Five Points, not far from her birthplace, Athens, Georgia. Taken with instagram

bohemiansouth:

Madeleine Peyroux put on a great show tonight at the Variety Playhouse in Atlanta’s Little Five Points, not far from her birthplace, Athens, Georgia. Taken with instagram

They came screaming out of a dorm window somewhere in 1968 and on the way to some place you had to stop and wonder why someone was playing a fugue. Much less a fugue on a campus. And playing it so frickin’-frackin’ loud. Then “Chest Fever” began in earnest, Garth Hudson’s church organ lunacy — I think it was Bach — giving way to a solid snare snap and some lyrics that I still don’t understand. But it was then, after I chased down the source of that wonderful noise, that I began to pursue Levon Helm, the snapper of that snare, the definer of what became known as The Band and, for periods over the next four-plus decades, an inspiration for me and hundreds of guys who try to play the drums.